A Message to Parents

Dear Parents, I am finally back after a long silence for almost two years. It is very hard to disengage myself from thinking and writing about...

Archive for June, 2010

Teach Flexibility

Teach Flexibility

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting, tips

One of the most characteristic traits of autism is rigidity, inflexibility, love for sameness and repetitive behavior. Why? Because it is easier to redo something than do something new. Even neurotypical people have a hard time making changes in their lives. It is easier to keep a routine. Change always comes with some effort. Tips [&hellip

Continued: Tips for Sensory Problems

Continued: Tips for Sensory Problems

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

10- Ball Chair It is a big rubber ball seated on a four wheels base. Instead of sitting on a regular chair, fidgety agitated kids can enjoy sitting quietly and calmly on ball chairs. They are rare in special education classes because they are expensive. 11- Play Dough A great learning tool. Rolling, squeezing and [&hellip

Continued: Tips for Sensory Problems

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

This article is part II of a series of articles on sensory problems. Click here to read Part I. 5- Compressions and Hand Massage The compression techniques I’ve learned from the occupational therapist are very simple to implement. Educators and parents can do it very easily. Here are the rules: Compressions are applied on the [&hellip

Tips for Sensory Problems

Tips for Sensory Problems

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

These simple tools can be used at school and at home. They are easy to acquire and they don’t take too much room. 1- The “Write-on Wipe-off” board I simply called it the “white board”. I bought it at Lakeshore  (it is learning store) www.LakeshoreLearning.com for $4.95, it is a two sided board, one is lined [&hellip

Ideas for Sensory Problems

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

This is a list of things you can do or use to help children with sensory disorders. I will talk in more details about each one in future articles: “Write-on wipe-off” board Weighted vest Trampoline Massager Compressions and hands massage Bubbly cushion Bouncing ball Bean bag Bean tub Ball chair Play dough Balance beam Physical [&hellip

Sensory Problems

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting, tips

What appears to us as a misbehavior, is in fact a reaction of autistic children to their overwhelming environment. Often times they are oversensitive (hypersensitive). On the other hand, they can be indifferent to the input to their senses or under sensitive (hypo sensitive). If they get overstimulated they try to do anything to self-regulate [&hellip

Art and Autism

Art and Autism

By Nadia Shanab | autism, parenting, tips

One of the world’s most famous contemporary artists is an autistic man named Stephen Wiltshire. He was mute in his early childhood and used to throw severe temper tantrums. He lived in his own world and never related to other human beings. At the age of three he was diagnosed with autism and he had [&hellip

Be Positive

Be Positive

By Nadia Shanab | autism, parenting, tips

When you tell a child — especially with special needs — “don’t“, you leave her/him with no options. When you give an alternative or a substitute, you are giving her/him an opportunity to correct or modify the inappropriate behavior or action. What should you do? Use the affirmative form instead of the negative form when you [&hellip

Visual Timer

Visual Timer

By Nadia Shanab | autism, parenting, tips

Autistic children rely intensively on their visual skills. I always make sure to use a visual timer along with the daily schedule. The visual timer has the advantage of giving a real feeling of time. It helps estimate the elapsed time and anticipate the remaining time. It compares to the difference between a digital watch [&hellip

Temple Grandin: A Must-See Movie

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

It is one of very few true success stories told by a woman who lives with Asperger’s syndrome. She became an animal scientist and a professor at the university. The protagonist, Temple Grandin, was able to explain and describe very skillfully how a person with this condition feels, hears, sees, perceives and thinks. She helps people [&hellip