A Brilliant Idea To Handle A Temper Tantrum

Watch the video below and see how easy and fast a temper tantrum came to an end. The idea is easy to implement even if you don’t have a...

Posts Tagged ‘visual aids’

A Simple Tool for Discipline

A Simple Tool for Discipline

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting, tips

I simply call this tool “the cards system”. It is a disciplinary tool that can be made at home and it doesn’t cost a penny. I spend maximum 10 minutes to make it. For consistency reasons, it would be great if both, parents and school used the same tool. Parents, who implemented the idea and applied it [&hellip

Teach Independence

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

The ultimate goal, both, parents and educators are working for, is to render children with autism as independent as possible. We look far ahead, and picture them as adults, living independently, without the need of having us around. The best thing to do is to start the process as early as possible. Early intervention assures [&hellip

How to Deal with Temper Tantrum

How to Deal with Temper Tantrum

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting, tips

What is temper tantrum? It is a negative attention seeking that the child resorts to, in order to communicate his frustration in a socially inappropriate way. Usually the child’s frustration arises when a need or a desire hasn’t been met. Temper tantrum is a form of meltdown among many, like aggression, running off, screaming, and [&hellip

Tips for Sensory Problems

Tips for Sensory Problems

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

These simple tools can be used at school and at home. They are easy to acquire and they don’t take too much room. 1- The “Write-on Wipe-off” board I simply called it the “white board”. I bought it at Lakeshore  (it is learning store) www.LakeshoreLearning.com for $4.95, it is a two sided board, one is lined [&hellip

Ideas for Sensory Problems

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

This is a list of things you can do or use to help children with sensory disorders. I will talk in more details about each one in future articles: “Write-on wipe-off” board Weighted vest Trampoline Massager Compressions and hands massage Bubbly cushion Bouncing ball Bean bag Bean tub Ball chair Play dough Balance beam Physical [&hellip

Sensory Problems

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting, tips

What appears to us as a misbehavior, is in fact a reaction of autistic children to their overwhelming environment. Often times they are oversensitive (hypersensitive). On the other hand, they can be indifferent to the input to their senses or under sensitive (hypo sensitive). If they get overstimulated they try to do anything to self-regulate [&hellip

Art and Autism

Art and Autism

By Nadia Shanab | autism, parenting, tips

One of the world’s most famous contemporary artists is an autistic man named Stephen Wiltshire. He was mute in his early childhood and used to throw severe temper tantrums. He lived in his own world and never related to other human beings. At the age of three he was diagnosed with autism and he had [&hellip

Be Positive

Be Positive

By Nadia Shanab | autism, parenting, tips

When you tell a child — especially with special needs — “don’t“, you leave her/him with no options. When you give an alternative or a substitute, you are giving her/him an opportunity to correct or modify the inappropriate behavior or action. What should you do? Use the affirmative form instead of the negative form when you [&hellip

Visual Timer

Visual Timer

By Nadia Shanab | autism, parenting, tips

Autistic children rely intensively on their visual skills. I always make sure to use a visual timer along with the daily schedule. The visual timer has the advantage of giving a real feeling of time. It helps estimate the elapsed time and anticipate the remaining time. It compares to the difference between a digital watch [&hellip

Temple Grandin: A Must-See Movie

By Nadia Shanab | autism, general advice, parenting

It is one of very few true success stories told by a woman who lives with Asperger’s syndrome. She became an animal scientist and a professor at the university. The protagonist, Temple Grandin, was able to explain and describe very skillfully how a person with this condition feels, hears, sees, perceives and thinks. She helps people [&hellip